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Norway Fuel Prices

Norway Fuel Prices by Travel Information Europe

Check out the current fuel prices in Norway. You can refuel different types of fuel in Norway. Not all fuels are equally available.

Current Fuel Prices in Norway

Petrol: € 1.70
Diesel: € 1.50
LPG:

Fuel in Norway

Gasoline

E5

  • Euro 95 (Blyfri 95) is readily available in Norway.
  • Superplus 98 (Blyfri 98) is also readily available.
  • As far as is known, E10 (petrol with a maximum of 10% bioethanol) is not yet available in Norway.

E85

  • E85 (bioethanol) is hardly available in Norway anymore.

Diesel

B7

  • Diesel (Diesel) is readily available. B7 contains a maximum of 7% biodiesel.
  • Note: In Norway, in addition to regular diesel, the so-called avgiftsfri is also offered (VAT-free diesel, also known as red diesel). This type of diesel is cheaper than regular diesel, but may not be refueled by tourists. When tourists are caught refueling avgiftsfri during a police check (the diesel is recognizable in the tank because a green dye has been added to it), they risk a fine of NOK 20,000 (approximately € 2,000). The difference between the pumps is sometimes difficult to see, but often the avgiftsfri pumps are located next to the gas station or somewhere at the back.
  • It is recommended to refuel with special Norwegian diesel in winter because it crystallizes less quickly than regular (winter) diesel and can be used up to temperatures of minus 32 degrees.

Gas

LPG

  • LPG (LPG) is only available at about 80 filling stations. Most LPG filling stations are located in the southern part of the country, especially around Oslo. For an overview of LPG refueling locations in Norway, visit mylpg.eu.
  • In Norway the bayonet connection is used. For a LPG installation with a bayonet connection, no attachment is required to refuel LPG. However, there are also several LPG stations in Norway that use a different filling system. In that case, the so-called LPG filling nipple Italy (dish) is required.

CNG

  • Natural gas is limited available. There are about 30 natural gas filling stations in Norway (source: ngva.eu). For an up-to-date overview of all locations, visit cngeurope.com or use the PitPoint app for IOS or Android to find natural gas filling stations.

H2

  • Hydrogen is only available in a very limited way in Norway. For more information, visit hydrogen.no.

Electricity

  • Norway has more than 18,000 ladestasjoner, or charging points (source: eafo.eu), most of which are located in the south of the country and in Oslo. (For comparison: The Netherlands has more than 60,000 charging points according to eafo.eu.)
  • The network of public charging points is extensive and it is quite possible to travel through Norway with an electric car.
  • Cars that run exclusively on electricity do not have to pay parking fees and tolls in Norway and can use the bus lane.
  • For an up-to-date overview of the locations of charging points, visit uppladdning.nu, chargemap.com and openchargemap.org or search for charging points via, for example, the Chargemap app (iOS and Android).

Petrol stations

  • In the mountains and in remote areas the distances between petrol stations can be long (more than 100 km). Therefore, take every opportunity to refuel.

Opening hours

  • In and around large cities, such as Oslo, Stavanger, Trondheim and Bergen, a large number of petrol stations are open day and night.
  • On the other main roads, most pumps are open from 7 am to 10 pm or 11 pm. In smaller towns and remote areas, closing time is often 9 pm.
  • Petrol stations at large shopping centers, supermarkets and bus stations remain open longer in the evening.
  • Keep in mind that many petrol stations are closed on Sundays (and sometimes also on Saturdays).

Pay

  • Cash can be paid at petrol stations.
  • Debit and credit cards are also accepted at almost all petrol stations.
  • Note: Keep in mind that sometimes you can not pay (anymore) in the store of the petrol station, but only at the filling machine because the store is (now) operated by a different company than the pumps.

Tank dispensers

  • After closing time, you can refuel at a filling machine at almost all petrol stations.
  • You can pay with a bank card or credit card at most fuel dispensers. Note: When paying with a bank card or credit card, you almost always have to enter a four-digit pin code. Also keep in mind that bank cards and credit cards are sometimes not accepted.
  • There are only a few filling machines where you can pay with coins or banknotes.
  • Note: When paying with a bank card, a certain standard amount of € 100-150 is often first reserved on the account as a deposit (pre-authorization) to check whether the balance is sufficient for a full tank. Usually within 20 minutes the amount for which you refueled, is debited and the rest of the money released, but sometimes it can also take a few days up to two weeks for the reserve

Cheap refueling

  • In Norway, drivers generally find the cheapest fuel available on a Sunday or early Monday morning just before fuel prices are increased on Monday. Fuel prices also peak on Thursdays and are lower on Wednesdays and early Thursday mornings.
  • In Sweden and also in Denmark, fuel is generally considerably cheaper, so it may be worthwhile to refuel across the border in border areas.

Reserve fuel

  • It is recommended not to carry more than 10 liters of fuel in a reserve tank specially approved for the transport of flammable substances.
  • On some ferries it is forbidden to bring a reserve tank of fuel.